Creating Believable Space

In today’s lesson we will be looking at how to create depth in a landscape drawing or painting.

The first method is to create divisions on your canvas. These divisions will be created by vastly different values which will inhabit each section.  Learn to see the Foreground, Middleground, and Background in the painting. And begin thinking about creating similar divisions in your drawings.

In today’s lesson we will be looking at how to create depth in a landscape drawing or painting.

The first method is to create divisions on your canvas. These divisions will be created by vastly different values which will inhabit each section.  Learn to see the Foreground, Middleground, and Background in the painting. And begin thinking about creating similar divisions in your drawings.

This has been used in painting for centuries. In the image below by a Dutch landscape master ( Cuyp ) we can see how the composition has been divided into different value sections.

Aelbert_Cuyp_-_Rivierlandschap_met_ruiters_-_Google_Art_Project

Now, I’d like you take 4 small thumbnail sketches of some imaginary landscapes. Similar to the example below. Get some ink, a small brush, and two small containers to hold your water. In the one container I put a few drops of ink into the water, and therefore got a middle grey. I then made a lighter grey with more water in the larger container. You can also layer these washes to further darken an area. However, plan out where your white will be because there’s no going back with ink.

a-ink-wash

thumbnail-ink-sketches

Perspective is an illusion which makes a 2 dimensional surface (ie. a piece of paper, or a screen) look as if it is 3 dimensional. This can be achieved in a variety of ways. The following exercise will involve making drawings from the video tutorials below.

1 point perspective. Which you can watch a video tutorial here about.

2 point perspective

and 3 point perspective

Another type of perspective which can be used in shallow spaces is isometric perspective. Where you simply draw all the lines which are receding into the distance in parallel.

 

 

 

 

In this section I’d like you to use the same principles, and apply them to imagery involving people in landscapes and interiors. One place we can see this juxtaposition all the time is in film. It’s no mistake that film scenes are composed in a similar manner to classical paintings. These methods work for creating believable space.

Look at the gallery below, and make 3 drawings using ink washes which show a clear division in value between the foreground, middleground, and background. If you want, use a still from one of your favorite films that also exhibits the same qualities.

Here are the required drawings for this section.

4 thumbnail sketches demonstrating foreground, middleground, background

3 drawing demonstrating 1pt, 2pt, and 3 pt perspective

3 Ink wash drawings from film stills

 

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